Paddle Board & Surfboard Volumes Explained - Whats your Guild Factor?

Surfboard Volume Using The Guild Factor

About Whitney Guild

John Whitney Guild was born and raised in southern Cali into a surfing family. He had a top 16 AAAA ranking and his contest victories span 5 decades. He was a team rider for Greg Noll, Bing and Jacobs and one of the early tow in surfers to ride a fifty foot wave in Maui at age 50.  His mission of late has been introducing the surfing and paddling world to the importance of Volume using his Guild Factor (GF) and Volume calculation formulas to progress the sport and help people dial in the correct board based on dimensions and Volume.


What is VOLUME ? 


Volume is the new 4th dimension in surfboard & paddle board design. Rather than look at just board length x thickness x width we need to also assess Volume. Today, with the advent of Computer Design board shaping, we can accurately measure the volume of any surfboard & paddle board easily and most companies indicate volume on every board produced for the consumer.


VOLUME
is described as "the precise measurement of the foam INSIDE your board" or simply put "How many liter soda bottles will fit inside a board if it was hollow inside?" 


Volume directly translates to how much FLOTATION a board has.  Board Flotation is just as critical of a measurement as any other dimension.  Not enough foam and it will not perform correctly.  Too much foam and it will not perform correctly. The proper amount of foam, also known as VOLUME or FLOTATION is directly related to a Surfer or Paddlers body weight and ability level. Novice surfers will use more Volume and expert surfers will always try to get away with the lowest amount of Volume that they can.


Whitney Guild created a VOLUMETRIC SYSTEM using what he calls a Guild Factor or GF you can utilize along with a simple formula to indicate the proper volume for your body weight, ability level and type of board you choose to ride.  Lighter individuals will use lower Volumes than Heavier Surfers. Obviously, Shortboards, Funboards, Longboards and SUP boards have different parameters to obtain their optimum performance.

What is your Guild Factor ?


The GF or GUILD FACTOR Scale is the Ratio of Your Body Weight to the amount of Foam in your Surfboard or Paddle Board.  It is: Liters of Foam divided by your body weight in Kilos.

Choosing your GF (Guild Factor)


Select your skill level below and choose your GF (Guild Factor). Simply multiply this factor by your weight in kilograms and your optimum board Volume is calculated.

How to Calculate Volume Using Your GF?


For Surfboards:
*Lets calculate Volume for 175lb rider of a Funboard Surfboard with .40 GF as indicated from the above chart
FORMULA:   Weight in Kilos X GF for Skill Level = Liters of Board Volume
Weight (175 lbs)*.45 = 78.75 kilos X GF Factor for Skill Level (.40 GF) = 31 Liters

*The optimum volume for this person is a Funboard Surfboard with Volume of 31 liters or more. Any board with a volume less than this is going to be unstable for the rider.

For Paddle Boards:
*Lets calculate Volume for 155lb SUP Novice Rider with 2.0 GF as indicated from the above chart
FORMULA:   Weight in Kilos X GF for Skill Level = Liters of Board Volume
Weight (155 lbs)*.45 = 69.75 kilos X GF Factor for Skill Level (2.0 GF) = 139.5 Liters
*The optimum volume for this person is a paddle board with Volume of 139.5 liters or more. Any board with a volume less than this is going to be unstable for the rider.


Why is knowing your optimum board Volume useful?

Knowing the optimum board Volume based on your Weight and Skill level is helpfull when shopping around for a board size and getting a board with optimum float and performance for your weight and skill level. Just looking at the dimensions of Length X Width X Thickness does not tell the whole story and knowing board Volume is equally important


Finding the right Isle Surfboard & Paddle Board

We offer a specification chart with Volume for all Isle Surfboards & Paddle Boards using the Guild Factors above based on skill level.


Basics of Volume Video